Turkey Cultural Tour   
Ankara Anatolian Civilizations Museum
Ankara Anatolian Civilizations Museum
Ankara Anatolian Civilizations Museum
Ankara Anatolian Civilizations Museum
Ankara Anatolian Civilizations Museum
Ankara Anatolian Civilizations Museum
Ankara Anatolian Civilizations Museum
 The first museum in Ankara was founded at the tower of castle, named Akkale in 1921 by the Director of Culture Mr Mübarek Galip. Besides this museum, the works were also collected in Augustus Temple and Roman Bath. When the Hittite Works in surrounding cities began to be sent to Ankara with the idea of Atatürk establishing a “Hittite Museum” in the centre, a museum building with a large area was necessary. Mahmud Pasha Bazaar and Kursunlu Inn, in deserted and ruined state, was suggested to be used as museum complex by Mr Hamit Zübeyr Koşay, the Director of Culture of that time, to Mr Saffet Arıkan, Vice-Ministry of Education of that period. Upon being approved, the complexes went into restoration between the dates 1938 and 1968. With the completion of most parts of vaulted hall in the middle of bazaar in 1940, the pieces began to be placed. While the reparation of buildings continued in 1943, the middle section of the museum was  opened to public visits. In 1948, 
The Anatolian Civilizations Museum, being among exceptional museums with its unique collection, has Anatolian archaeological artefacts and artefacts from the Palaeolithic Age to the present.
Anatolian Civilizations Museum. Anatolian Civilizations Museum reaching the present time with its historical buildings and its deeply rooted history was elected as the first "Museum of the Year" in Switzerland on April 19, 1997.
 
Palaeolithic Age (....8000): The Age is represented by the remains discovered in the Antalya Karain Cave. The people of Palaeolithic Age were hunting and collecting communities living in caves. The stone and bone tools of the people of that Age are exhibited.
 
Neolithic Age (8000-5500) : During this age food production began and first settlements were established by the communities of this age. The artefacts of the age were discovered in two important centres of the age, namely Çatalhöyük and Hacılar and are exhibited in the museum. The remains include the mother goddess sculptures, stamps, earthenware containers, agricultural tools made of bone.
 
Calcolithic (Copper-Stone) Age (B.C. 5500-3000): In addition to stone tools, copper was processed and used in daily life during this age, and rich remains dating from this Age which were discovered in Hacılar, Canhasan, Tilkitepe, Alacahöyük and Alişar are exhibited in the museum.
 
Old Bronze Age (B.C. 3000-1950): The people living in Anatolia in the beginning of the 3rd millennium B.C. added tin and alloy to copper and invented bronze. They also worked all metals of the age with casting and hammering techniques. Valuable metals, magnificent death presents discovered from royal tombs of Alacahöyük, ruins from Hasanoğlan, Mahmatlar, Eskiyapar, Horoztepe, Karaoğlan, Merzifon, Etiyokuşu, Ahlatlıbel, Karayavşan, Bolu, Beycesultan Semahöyük, and Karaz-Tilki Hill constitute the rich Old Bronze Age and are exhibited in the museum.
 
Hittites (B.C. 1750-1200): T
he first political union in Anatolia in the 2nd millennium was established by the Hittites in the Kızılırmak basin. The capital city was Boğazköy (Hattuşaş) and other important centres were İnandık, Eskiyapar, Alacahöyük, Alişar, and Ferzant. Embossed bull figure containers, earthenware artefacts, tablets of government archives, seals in the name of the king can be seen.
Phrygian (B.C. 1200-700) : The Phrygians immigrated from the Balkans in the 1200s and acquired control over Anatolia, their centre was Gordion. The works of art discovered in Gordion and its ruins are the best examples of the Phrygians and are exhibited in the museum.
Urartu (B.C. 1200-600) : The Urartu civilisation reached an advanced architecture and mining technology in centres like Altıntepe, Adilcevaz, Kayalıdere, Patnos, Van, Çavuştepe and lived during the same period as the Phrygians.
Late Hittites (B.C. 1200-700): Upon end of the Hittite Empire, some Hittite communities established province states in south and south-east Anatolia, and the Late Hittites Principalities Period ensued. Malatya-Aslantepe, Kargamış, Sakçagözü are some important Late Hittites settlements.
Our collections including Greek, Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine Period artefacts from the 1st millennium, made of gold, silver, glass, marble, and bronze and coins represent exceptional cultural assets.Ancient Jewellery is exhibited in the Anatolian Civilizations Museum.The Museum of Anatolian Civilizations has eight distinct sections, following a chronological order, filled with precious artifacts that shed light on Turkey’s ancient history. The first section features findings from the Paleolithic Age (before 8000 B.C.), including stone and bone tools used by hunter and gatherer communities that lived in caves. Neolithic Age (8000–5500 B.C) artifacts display the beginning of food production and settlements by the communities that lived in the era. Among the objects are sculptures of mother goddesses, stamps, earthenware, and tools made of bone.

The Chalcolithic Age, or Copper Age, (5500–3000 B.C.) is represented by stone and copper tools, which became more common in the daily lives of the contemporary communities. Bronze, tin, and alloy begin to make an appearance in the Old Bronze Age (3000–1950 B.C.); casting and hammering techniques were also developed during this time, and visitors can see them with valuable metals and beautiful, symbolic sculptures from discovered tombs.The artifacts become even more impressive by the time the exhibitions explore the Hittites (1750–1200 B.C.), Anatolia’s first political union formed in the Kızılırmak basin. The Hittite Empire’s many remnants include seals from the king, bull-figure and earthenware containers, and tablets from government archives discovered in Hattuşas, the empire’s former capital, as well as other important sites. The museum’s last three exhibitions include artifacts from the Phrygians (1200–700 B.C.), who migrated from the Balkans and gained control over Anatolia with a capital in Gordium, and the advanced architectural technology 

of the Urartu civilization (1200–600 B.C.). At the end of the ancient tale are the Late Hittites (1200–700 B.C.), the Hittite communities that broke away from the core empire and established their own states in Anatolia.

 
 
 
Turkey Cultural Tour
Zincirlidere Cd.Sisli-Istanbul/Turkey
• Tel: +90 532 3163653 • Tel: +90 212 2893252 • Fax: +90 212 2893252
• tours@turkeyculturaltour.com, • http://www.turkeyculturaltour.com
Turkey Cultural Tour
Zincirlidere Cd.Sisli-Istanbul/Turkey
• Tel: +90 532 3163653 • Tel: +90 212 2893252 • Fax: +90 212 2893252
• tours@turkeyculturaltour.com, • http://www.turkeyculturaltour.com