Turkey Cultural Tour   
Sivas- Divrigi Great Mosque and Hospital (UNESCO Site) Turkey
Sivas- Divrigi Great Mosque and Hospital (UNESCO Site) Turkey
Sivas- Divrigi Great Mosque and Hospital (UNESCO Site) Turkey
Sivas- Divrigi Great Mosque and Hospital (UNESCO Site) Turkey
Sivas- Divrigi Great Mosque and Hospital (UNESCO Site) Turkey
Sivas- Divrigi Great Mosque and Hospital (UNESCO Site) Turkey
Sivas- Divrigi Great Mosque and Hospital (UNESCO Site) Turkey
 

Sivas is a city in central Turkey and the seat of  Sivas province  According to a 2011 estimate, its urban population is 425,297.The city, which lies at an elevation of 4,193 feet (1,278 m) in the broad valley of the Kızılırmak  river, is a moderately-sized trade center and industrial city, although the economy has traditionally been based on agriculture. Rail repair shops and a thriving manufacturing industry of rugs, bricks, cement, and cotton and woolen textiles form the mainstays of the city's economy. The surrounding region is a cereal-producing area with large deposits of iron ore which are worked at  Divriği.A cultural hub as well as an industrial one, Sivas contains many examples of 13th-century  Seljuk architecture. The Mavi Medrese from 1271, the  Şifaiye  Medresesi  from 1218 and the Çifte Minare Medresesi from 1271, with its intricately carved facade and minarets, are among the most noteworthy monuments. The oldest surviving mosque is the Grand Mosque (Ulu Camii) completed in 1196 is famous for its simplicity. The city is also famous for its Medreses (Islamic seminaries). Gök Medresesi (the Celestial Madrasa; depicted on the  obverse  of the Turkish 500  lira  banknote of 1927-1939 and Mavi Medrese,  Sifaiye Medresesi , on the other hand, was completed earlier, on the eve of the second wave of Turkic immigration to Anatolia, in 1218 and the with its intricately carved facade and minarets are among the most noteworthy edifices carries on the traditional Seljuk Medrese plan.The city also contains some fine examples of the Ottoman architectural style. Kurşunlu Hamamı (Leaden Bath) which was completed in 1576, is the largest Turkish bath in the city and it contains many details from the classical Ottoman bath building. Behrampaşa Hanı (Caravansaray), was completed in 1573 and it is famous for the lion motifs around its windows.

Divriği Great Mosque and Hospital (Turkish: Divriği Ulu Camii ve Darüşşifası) is an ornately decorated mosque and medical complex built in 1228-1229 in the small eastern Anatolian mountain town of Divriği, now in Sivas Province in Turkey. The architect was Hürremshah of Ahlat and the mosque was built on the order of Ahmet Shah, ruler of the Mengujekids. The inscriptions contain words of praise to the Anatolian Seljuk sultan Alaeddin Keykubad I. The adjoining medical center (darüşşifa) was built simultaneously with the mosque on the order of Turan Melek Sultan, daughter of the Mengujek ruler of Erzincan, Fahreddin Behram Shah.The exquisite carvings and architecture of both buildings put them among the most important works of architecture in Anatolia and led to their inclusion on UNESCO's World Heritage List in 1985. Of particular note are the geometrical and floral reliefs on the main door.

The Kangal is a breed of livestock guardian dog, originating from the Kangal district in Sivas Province, Turkey. It is of an early mastiff type with a solid, pale tan or sabled coat, and with a black mask. According to the official Kangal organisations in Turkey - Cynology Federation Of Turkey (KIF) and Ankara Kangal Derneği (ANKADER) Kangals in Turkey may also be brindle or recessive black tan pattern with or without a black mask; and/or with white markings.
While the Kangal is often referred to as a sheep dog, it is not a herding dog, but rather a flock guardian that lives with the flock of sheep to actively fend off wolves, bears and jackals. The Sivas Kangal Dog's protectiveness, loyalty and gentleness with small children and animals has led to its growing popularity as a guardian for families as well, as it regards people as its "flock" and guards them with extreme devotion.
Located in the Central Anatolian Region, the Province of Sivas, Turkey is the home of the little doctors of Kangal, the fish with a license to heal. The town of Kangal, famous for the Kangal mastiff, the seminary of the twin minarets and the Gok or Sky seminary, is 300 miles east of Ankara.
The Kangal Hot Spring with Fish, located in a green valley surrounded by a barren countryside, has been sought out by sufferers of various ailments, most particularly psoriasis, ulcers, rheumatism and St. Anthony's fire. The Kangal Hot Spring's water is 36 degrees C. (96 F), the same as normal body heat, with a ph of 7.3. The water contains iron aluminate, anions, sulfate, hydrocarbonate, metasilicic acid, nitrate, calcium, magnesium sulfate, chlorine, sodium, magnesium, and millions of "doctor fish," which suck out the scaly red patches on the skin in a curettage-like fashion.
 
 
Turkey Cultural Tour
Zincirlidere Cd.Sisli-Istanbul/Turkey
• Tel: +90 532 3163653 • Tel: +90 212 2893252 • Fax: +90 212 2893252
• tours@turkeyculturaltour.com, • http://www.turkeyculturaltour.com
Turkey Cultural Tour
Zincirlidere Cd.Sisli-Istanbul/Turkey
• Tel: +90 532 3163653 • Tel: +90 212 2893252 • Fax: +90 212 2893252
• tours@turkeyculturaltour.com, • http://www.turkeyculturaltour.com