Turkey Cultural Tour   
Terra Cotta And Ceramics Making İn Cappadocia
Terra Cotta And Ceramics Making İn Cappadocia
Terra Cotta And Ceramics Making İn Cappadocia
Terra Cotta And Ceramics Making İn Cappadocia
Terra Cotta And Ceramics Making İn Cappadocia
Terra Cotta And Ceramics Making İn Cappadocia
Terra Cotta And Ceramics Making İn Cappadocia
The term "ceramic" means a compound that is an inorganic, non-metallic oxide that is formed by heat.  The word "ceramic" is actually a generic term that encompasses things such as porcelain, red and white body tiles, glass (although glass is an amorphous material meaning there is no crystalline structure), space shuttle tiles, semi-conductors, dishes, toilets, etc.  For instance, when selecting floor or wall tiles you are actually selecting among the vast array of tiles such as: glazed and unglazed red and white body tiles, glazed porcelain, glazed and unglazed through body porcelain tiles, and glass tiles. Whew! All of these different types of tiles can really get one confused. All floor and wall tiles go through a similar manufacturing process with the exception of glass tile, the raw materials are mined from the ground, mixed together at certain ratios and processed through different manufacturing steps, then the material is pressed, glazed, fired, inspected/sorted, packed and shipped. orcelain is a ceramic  material made by heating raw materials, generally including  clay  in the form of  kaolin, in a  kiln  to temperatures between 1,200 C (2,192  F) and 1,400 °C (2,552 °F). The toughness, strength, and translucence of porcelain arise mainly from the formation of  glass  and the mineral  mullite  within the fired body at these high temperatures.
Porcelain derives its present name from old  Italian  porcellana   because of its resemblance to the translucent surface of the shell. Porcelain can informally be referred to as "china" or "fine china" in some English-speaking countries, as China and Asia  was the birthplace of porcelain making .
For the purposes of trade, the Combined Nomenclature of the European Communities defines porcelain as being "completely vitrified, hard, impermeable (even before glazing), white or artificially coloured, translucent (except when of considerable thickness), and resonant." However, the term porcelain lacks a universal definition and has "been applied in a very unsystematic fashion to substances of diverse kinds which have only certain surface-qualities in common" (Burton 1906).
The clays used are often described as being long or short, depending on their plasticty. Long clays are cohesive (sticky) and have high plasticity; short clays are less cohesive and have lower plasticity. In  soil mechanics, plasticity is determined by measuring the increase in content of water required to change a clay from a solid state bordering on the plastic, to a plastic state bordering on the liquid, though the term is also used less formally to describe the facility with which a clay may be worked. Clays used for porcelain are generally of lower plasticity and are shorter than many other pottery clays. They wet very quickly, meaning that small changes in the content of water can produce large changes in workability. Thus, the range of water content within which these clays can be worked is very narrow and the loss or gain of water during storage and throwing or forming must be carefully controlled to keep the clay from becoming too wet or too dry to manipulate.
The following section provides background information on the methods used to form, decorate, finish, glaze, and fire ceramic wares.
 
 
 
Turkey Cultural Tour
Zincirlidere Cd.Sisli-Istanbul/Turkey
• Tel: +90 532 3163653 • Tel: +90 212 2893252 • Fax: +90 212 2893252
• tours@turkeyculturaltour.com, • http://www.turkeyculturaltour.com
Turkey Cultural Tour
Zincirlidere Cd.Sisli-Istanbul/Turkey
• Tel: +90 532 3163653 • Tel: +90 212 2893252 • Fax: +90 212 2893252
• tours@turkeyculturaltour.com, • http://www.turkeyculturaltour.com